SOURCES, RESOURCES, CREDITS

Selected Bibliography



Brown, Kendall H.; Minichiello, Sharon; and Honolulu Academy of Arts. Taishō Chic: Japanese Modernity, Nostalgia, and Deco (Honolulu: Honolulu Academy of Arts, 2001).

Conor, Liz. The Spectacular Modern Woman: Feminine Visibility in the 1920s (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2004).

Fuku Noriko; Fukuhara, Shinzo; Fukuhara, Roso; Sepia International Inc.; and the Alkazi Collection of Photography. Shinzo and Roso Fukuhara: Photographs by Ginza Modern Boys 1913-1941 (New York: SEPIA International Inc., 2000).

Garon, Sheldon. "Luxury Is the Enemy: Mobilizing Savings and Popularizing Thrift in Wartime Japan" (Journal of Japanese Studies 26, no. 1 [2000]: pp. 41-78).

Gumpert, Lynn. Face to Face: Shiseido and the Manufacture of Beauty, 1900-2000. (New York: Grey Art Gallery, New York University, 2000.)

Ibuka, Akira. "Shōgyō Shashin" (Shinbun Shashin, Shōgyō Shashin, pp. 13-58, Tokyo: Shinkōsha, 1935).

Inoue, Mariko. "Kiyokata's Asasuzu: The Emergence of the Jogakusei Image" (Monumenta Nipponica 51, no. 4, Winter 1996: pp. 431-460).

Kawashima, Yoko. Shiseido Burando (Tokyo: Asupekuto, 2007).

Kery, Patricia Frantz. Art Deco Graphics (London: Thames & Hudson, 2002).

Mitamura, Fukiko. Yume to Yokubō no Kosume Sensō (Tokyo: Shinchōsha, 2005).

The Modern Girl Around the World Research Group. The Modern Girl around the World: Consumption, Modernity, and Globalization. Edited by Alys Eve Weinbaum, Lynn M. Thomas, Priti Ramamurthy, Uta G. Poiger, Madeleine Yue Dong and Tani E. Barlow (Durham: Duke University Press, 2008).

Peiss, Kathy Lee. Hope in a Jar: The Making of America's Beauty Culture (New York: Henry Holt, 1999).

Sakane, Susumu and Suntory Museum. Bijo Hyakunen: Posuta ni Saita Jidai no Hanatachi (Osaka, Tempōzan: Suntory Museum, 1994).

Sato, Barbara Hamill. The New Japanese Woman: Modernity, Media, and Women in Interwar Japan (Durham: Duke University Press, 2003).

Setagaya Bijutsukan. Fukuhara Shinzo to Bijutsu to Shiseido-ten (Tokyo: Setagaya Art Museum, 2007).

Shiseido. Bi to Chi no Mīmu, Shiseidō-ten (Shizuoka, Kakegawa: Shiseido Kigyō Shiryōkan Shiseido Āto Hausu, 1998).

Shiseido Senden Shi. 3 vols (Tokyo: Shiseido, 1979).

Shiseido Gallery. Ginza Modan to Toshi Ishō (Tokyo: Shiseido Kikaku Bunkabu, 1993).

Weisenfeld, Gennifer. "Designing after Disaster: Barrack Decoration and the Great Kantō Earthquake" (Japanese Studies 18, no. 3 [1998]: pp. 229-46).

Yamana, Ayao. Yamana Ayao Seitan Hyakunen Kinen Sakuhinshū (Tokyo: Shiseido, 1998).

Yamana, Ayao; Midori, Yanai; Bijutsukan, Meguro-ku; and JAC Project. Yamana Ayao-ten: Eien no Joseizō, Yosooi no Bigaku (Tokyo: Meguro-ku Bijutsukan, 1998).

"‘From Baby’s First Bath’: Kao Soap and Modern Japanese Commercial Design" (The Art Bulletin LXXXVI, no. 3 [2004]: pp. 573-98).

"Japanese Modernism and Consumerism: Forging the New Artistic Field of Shōgyō Bijutsu (Commercial Art)" In Being Modern in Japan: Culture and Society from the 1910s to the 1930s, edited by Elise K. Tipton and John Clark, pp. 75-98 (Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2000).

"Japanese Typographic Design and the Art of Letterforms." In Bridges to Heaven: Essays on East Asian Art in Honor of Professor Wen C. Fong. Edited by Jerome Silbergeld and Dora C.Y. Ching (Princeton: P.Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Center for East Asian Art, Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University in association with Princeton University Press, forthcoming).


Footnotes


1. Shiseido began producing cosmetics in 1896.

2. Kathy Lee Peiss, Hope in a Jar: The Making of America's Beauty Culture, 1st Owl Books ed. (New York: Henry Holt, 1999), p. 6.

3. Fukuhara learned the chemical techniques of photography from Hirano Ikkan, a true Renaissance man, who, after returning from his studies in Germany, took up black-box photography as well as oil painting. Displaying a wide range of skills, Hirano is even credited with being the first Japanese to manufacture genuine perfume. Fukuhara published some of the photographs he took in Paris in June 1921 in an issue of the Shashin Geijutsusha’s magazine Shashin Geijutsu (Photographic Arts) under the title “Paris and the Seine, Part I.” The following year in March, he published a separate volume of 24 of the works under the title Paris and the Seine. Shiseido, Shiseido Senden Shi, 3 vols., vol. 1 (Tokyo: Shiseido 1979), pp. 12-13, p. 15, Fuku Noriko et al., Shinzo and Roso Fukuhara: Photographs by Ginza Modern Boys 1913-1941 (New York: SEPIA International Inc., 2000).

4. Fukuhara Arinobu’s stewardship of the pharmacy at the prestigious and modern Tokyo Hospital, founded by Doctor Takagi Kanehiro, inestimably contributed to consumer confidence in the Fukuhara name.

5. Inoue Mariko, "Kiyokata's Asasuzu: The Emergence of the Jogakusei Image," Monumenta Nipponica 51, no. 4 (1996).

6. Peiss, Hope in a Jar: The Making of America's Beauty Culture, pp. 16-17.

7. Shiseido, Shiseido Senden Shi, p. 21.

8. Shiseido also marketed two liquid white powders: Blanc de Perles and Eau de Neige. Ibid., p. 22, pp. 34-35.

9. http://www.unilever.com/ourbrands/personalcare/Ponds.asp

10. Shiseido promoted the popular European trend of putting an open bottle of perfume in one’s drawers to infuse one’s clothing with scent rather than apply the scent to a handkerchief. Shiseido Geppō 2, December 1924, p. 1

11. For an in-depth discussion of the new woman and the modern girl, see: Barbara Hamill Sato, The New Japanese Woman: Modernity, Media, and Women in Interwar Japan (Durham: Duke University Press, 2003).

12. Shiseido, Shiseido Senden Shi, p. 10.

13. The Hanatsubaki-kai and its coupon books were introduced in Shiseido Graph 43, February 1937, pp. 18-19.

14. Ibuka Akira, "Shōgyō Shashin," in Shinbun Shashin, Shōgyō Shashin, pp. 13-58, (Tokyo: Shinkōsha, 1935).

15. Shiseido Graph 17, December 1934, cover.

16. “Ginpa o kōshite,” Shiseido Graph 3, September 1933, p. 9; Shiseido Graph 5, November 1933, p. 9.

17. “Ryūkō no gōka” (Trends in Luxury), Shiseido Graph 10, May 1934, p. 14.

18. The Chainstore Research 9, March 1936, cover.

19. For a discussion of Kao soap advertising design, see: Gennifer Weisenfeld, "‘from Baby’s First Bath’: Kao Soap and Modern Japanese Commercial Design," The Art Bulletin LXXXVI, no. 3 (2004).

20. See Gennifer Weisenfeld, "Japanese Modernism and Consumerism: Forging the New Artistic Field of Shōgyō Bijutsu (Commercial Art)," in Being Modern in Japan: Culture and Society from the 1910s to the 1930s, edited by Elise K. Tipton and John Clark (Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2000); and Gennifer Weisenfeld, "Japanese Typographic Design and the Art of Letterforms," in Bridges to Heaven: Essays on East Asian Art in Honor of Professor Wen C. Fong, edited by Jerome Silbergeld and Dora C.Y. Ching (Princeton: P.Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Center for East Asian Art, Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University in association with Princeton University Press, forthcoming).

21. The Chainstore Research 26, August 1937, inside back cover.

22. The Chainstore Research 29, November 1937, inside back cover.

23. Shiseido, Shiseido Senden Shi, p. 48.

24. For a discussion of this compendium and commercial art trade journals of the period, see Weisenfeld, "Japanese Modernism and Consumerism: Forging the New Artistic Field of Shōgyō Bijutsu (Commercial Art)."

25. Shiseido, Shiseido Senden Shi, p. 47, p. 49.

26. Gennifer Weisenfeld, "Designing after Disaster: Barrack Decoration and the Great Kantō Earthquake," Japanese Studies 18, no. 3 (1998).

27. The Chainstore Research 28, October 1937, cover.

28. The Chainstore Research 30, December 1937, cover.

29. Shiseido Chainstore Alma Mater 2, no. 11, November 1940, cover.

30. Sheldon Garon, "Luxury Is the Enemy: Mobilizing Savings and Popularizing Thrift in Wartime Japan," Journal of Japanese Studies 26, no. 1 (2000).

31. Shiseido, Shiseido Senden Shi, p. 167.

32. Shiseido Chainstore Alma Mater 2, no. 9, August 1940, back cover.

33. Shiseido, Shiseido Senden Shi, p. 179.


Credits


“Selling Shiseido” was developed by Visualizing Cultures at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and presented on MIT OpenCourseWare.

MIT Visualizing Cultures:
John W. Dower
Project Director
Emeritus Professor of History

Shigeru Miyagawa
Project Director
Professor of Linguistics
Kochi Prefecture-John Manjiro Professor of Japanese Language and Culture

Ellen Sebring
Creative Director

Scott Shunk
Program Director

Andrew Burstein
Media designer

In collaboration with:
Gennifer Weisenfeld
Associate Professor
Art, Art History & Visual Studies
Duke University

Author, essay: “Selling Shiseido: Cosmetics Advertising & Design in Early 20th-Century Japan”

Shiseido Co., Ltd.

Special thanks to Duke University Asian/Pacific Studies Institute
Duke University Arts & Sciences Committee on Faculty Research

Support


Funding for this website was provided by:

The d'Arbeloff Excellence in Education Fund
The J. Paul Getty Foundation
The Henry Luce Foundation
The Andrew Mellon Foundation
The U.S. Department of Education
The Center for Global Partnership
The Andrew Mellon Foundation






 
 

MIT Visualizing Cultures

On viewing images of a potentially disturbing nature: click here.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology © 2010 Visualizing Cultures  Creative Commons License   Creative Commons - some rights reserved


 
MIT Visualizing Cultures
Selling Shiseido
MIT Visualizing Cultures
Selling Shiseido
MIT Visualizing CulturesMenu
MIT Visualizing Cultures
Tweet
Units
Selling Shiseido I
Essay
MIT Visualizing Cultures VC Units MIT Visualizing Cultures About VC VC Scholars Partner Institutions Outreach Events Contact Join Us Follow Us Selling Shiseido Introduction Cosmopolitan Glamour Marketing Beauty Luxury & Thrift in Wartime Sources/Resources Introduction Cosmopolitan Glamour Marketing Beauty Luxury and Thrift in Wartime Sources & Resources Introduction Cosmopolitan Glamour Marketing Beauty Luxury and Thrift in Wartime Sources & Resources Units Icon View Text View Curriculae Selling Shiseido II Essay Image Galleries Curriculum