SOURCES | NOTES | CREDITS


SOURCES


Andrew Gordon, Labor and Imperial Democracy in Prewar Japan (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1991), chapter 2

Michael Lewis, Rioters and Citizens: Mass Protest in Imperial Japan (Berkeley:
University of California Press, 1990)

Shumpei Okamoto, “The Hibiya Riot,” in Tetsuo Najita and J. Victor Koschmann eds.,
Conflict in Modern Japanese History: The Neglected Tradition (Princeton: Princeton
University Press, 1982)

Shumpei Okamamoto, The Japanese Oligarchy and the Russo-Japanese War (New York: Columbia University Press, 1970)



NOTES

1. On Yano’s encounter with the British illustrated publications, Yamada Naoko, “Jūgun shita gakka tachi: ‘Senji gahō’ ni okeru fudōsha monjin no katsudō” Joshi bijutsu daigaku kenkyū kiyō No. 33 (2004), p. 165 and Kuroiwa Hisako, Kunikida Doppo no jidai (Tokyo: Kadokawa shoten, 2007), p. 61.

2. The Western woodcut engravings were literally done against the grain of the block of wood, in contrast to Japanese wood block engravings which ran with the grain. This accounts for difference in the appearance of the two sorts of woodblocks. The Japanese illustrated publications of this era generally followed the Western practice rather than the traditional Japanese one.

3. Hiratsuka Atsushi, “Kinji gahōsha jidai no Doppo-shi,” Shinchō (7/15/1908), p. 128.

4. For a slightly more detailed narrative of the riot: Okamoto Shumpei, “The Hibiya Riot,” in Tetsuo Najita and J. Victor Koschmann eds., Conflict in Modern Japanese History:The Neglected Tradition (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1982), pp. 258-262.

5. Tokyo Asahi Shinbun, September 8, 1913, p. 5

6. Andrew Gordon, Labor and Imperial Democracy in Japan (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1991), p. 54.

7. Tokyo Asahi Shinbun, September 8, 1913, p. 5

8. Kuroiwa, Kunikida Doppo no jidai, p. 131.

9. Kuroiwa, Kunikida Doppo no jidai, p.72.

10. Yamada, “Jūgun shita gakka tachi,” p. 174.

11. Takahashi Yūsai, Meiji keisatsu shi kenkyū (Tokyo: Reibunsha, 1961), Vol. 2, p.103.

12. Kuroiwa, Kunikida Doppo no jidai, p. 131. His phrasing was “iyoiyo kakumei ga hajimatta ka naa?”

13. On Okoi’s role in the riot and its aftermath, see Kuroiwa Hisako, Nichiro sensō: shōri no ato no gosan (Bungei shunju, 2005), pp. 46-52, 95-100, 182-192.

14. Kuroiwa, Kunikida Doppo no jidai, p. 131.



LINKS

Andrew Gordon, Labor and Imperial Democracy in Prewar Japan (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1991)

http://www.adgordon.net



IMAGE CREDITS

Images in this unit, unless otherwise noted, are from a special edition of
The Japanese Graphic called The Tokyo Riot Graphic (Tokyo: Kinji Gahō Company), No. 66, Sept. 18, 1905. Collection of the author.

Visualizing Cultures is indebted to Waseda University Library, Tokyo, Japan for images from issues of Senji Gahō other than the special issue on the riot.



CREDITS

“Social Protest in Imperial Japan” was developed by
Visualizing Cultures at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
and presented on MIT OpenCourseWare.

MIT Visualizing Cultures:
John W. Dower
Project Director
Emeritus Professor of History

Shigeru Miyagawa
Project Director
Professor of Linguistics
Kochi Prefecture-John Manjiro Professor of Japanese Language and Culture

Ellen Sebring
Creative Director

Scott Shunk
Program Director

Andrew Burstein
Media designer

In collaboration with:
Andrew Gordon
Author, essay
Lee and Juliet Folger Fund Professor of History, Harvard University



SUPPORT

MIT Visualizing Cultures received generous funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Henry Luce Foundation, the Getty Foundation, Japan Foundation's Council for Global Partnership, National Endowment for the Humanities, and MIT's d'Arbeloff Fund for Innovation in Undergraduate Education and MIT Microsoft-funded iCampus project.

 




 
 


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