The Emergence of Modern America 1865-Present

Photograph of a sailboat model with American flag motif sails.

Model boat with American flag-motif sails. (Image courtesy Daniel Bersak.)


MIT Course Number


As Taught In

Spring 2003



Cite This Course

Course Highlights

This course features archived syllabi from various semesters.

Course Description

This subject studies the changing structure of American politics, economics, and society from the end of the Civil War to the present. We will consider secondary historical accounts and primary documents to examine some of the key issues in the development of modern America: industrialization and urbanization; U.S. emergence as a global power; ideas about rights and equality; and the changing structures of gender, class, and race. This subject also examines the multiple answers that Americans gave to the question of what it means to be an American in the modern age. As a communications intensive subject, students will be expected to engage intensively with the material through frequent oral and written exercises.

History Department Faculty, and Christopher Capozzola. 21H.102 The Emergence of Modern America 1865-Present, Spring 2003. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare), (Accessed). License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA

For more information about using these materials and the Creative Commons license, see our Terms of Use.