American Consumer Culture

Black and white photo of a card dealership.

Automobiles in window of the Washington-Cadillac Co., Washington, D.C. (Image courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA-OWI Collection, [reproduction number LC-USZ62-111329 DLC].)

Instructor(s)

MIT Course Number

21H.206

As Taught In

Fall 2007

Level

Undergraduate

Translated Versions

繁體字
简体字

Cite This Course

Course Features

Course Highlights

This course features archived syllabi from various semesters.

Course Description

This class examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. We will explore how such things as department stores, nationally advertised brand-name goods, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society, and politics. The course is organized both thematically and chronologically. Each period deals with a new development in the history of consumer culture. Throughout we explore both celebrations and critiques of mass consumption and abundance.

Other OCW Versions

Archived versions: Question_avt logo

Jacobs, Meg. 21H.206 American Consumer Culture, Fall 2007. (MIT OpenCourseWare: Massachusetts Institute of Technology), http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/history/21h-206-american-consumer-culture-fall-2007 (Accessed). License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA


For more information about using these materials and the Creative Commons license, see our Terms of Use.


Close