Classification, Natural Kinds, and Conceptual Change: Race as a Case Study

A caricature of racial intermarriage in the United States, 1864.

A political caricature of racial intermarriage in the United States, 1864. (Image courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division [reproduction number: LC-USZ62-8840 (b&w film copy neg.)].)

Instructor(s)

MIT Course Number

24.892

As Taught In

Spring 2004

Level

Graduate

Cite This Course

Course Description

This course will consider the claim that there is no such thing as race, with a particular emphasis on the question whether races should be thought of as natural kinds: is our concept of race a natural kind concept? Is the term 'race' a natural kind term? If so, is Appiah right to conclude that there are no races? How should one go about "analyzing" the concept of race?

Maglo, Koffi, and Sally Haslanger. 24.892 Classification, Natural Kinds, and Conceptual Change: Race as a Case Study, Spring 2004. (MIT OpenCourseWare: Massachusetts Institute of Technology), http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/linguistics-and-philosophy/24-892-classification-natural-kinds-and-conceptual-change-race-as-a-case-study-spring-2004 (Accessed). License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA


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