Kinetic Processes in Materials

Macro photo of gas bubbles in cola.

Nucleation is the onset of a phase transition, e.g. from liquid to gas, in a small but stable region. In this photo, bubbles in a soft drink each nucleate independently, responding to a decrease in pressure. (Photo courtesy of Wikipedia.)

Instructor(s)

MIT Course Number

3.21

As Taught In

Spring 2006

Level

Graduate

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Course Features

Course Description

This course presents a unified treatment of phenomenological and atomistic kinetic processes in materials. It provides the foundation for the advanced understanding of processing, microstructural evolution, and behavior for a broad spectrum of materials. The course emphasizes analysis and development of rigorous comprehension of fundamentals. Topics include: irreversible thermodynamics; diffusion; nucleation; phase transformations; fluid and heat transport; morphological instabilities; gas-solid, liquid-solid, and solid-solid reactions.

Russell, Kenneth, and Samuel Allen. 3.21 Kinetic Processes in Materials, Spring 2006. (MIT OpenCourseWare: Massachusetts Institute of Technology), http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/materials-science-and-engineering/3-21-kinetic-processes-in-materials-spring-2006 (Accessed). License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA


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