Differential Equations

Screenshot of Mathlet from the d'Arbeloff Interactive Math Project.

A spring system responds to being shaken by oscillating. When the input frequency is near a natural mode of the system, the amplitude is large. This can be understood in the frequency domain using the Laplace transform and its pole diagram. (Image courtesy Hu Hohn and Prof. Haynes Miller.)

Instructor(s)

MIT Course Number

18.03

As Taught In

Spring 2010

Level

Undergraduate

Translated Versions

(비디오) 한국

Cite This Course

Course Features

Course Description

Differential Equations are the language in which the laws of nature are expressed. Understanding properties of solutions of differential equations is fundamental to much of contemporary science and engineering. Ordinary differential equations (ODE's) deal with functions of one variable, which can often be thought of as time.

OCW Scholar Version

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Archived Versions

Miller, Haynes, and Arthur Mattuck. 18.03 Differential Equations, Spring 2010. (MIT OpenCourseWare: Massachusetts Institute of Technology), http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/mathematics/18-03-differential-equations-spring-2010 (Accessed). License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA


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