Tribology

Diagram of electrical connector pins.

As electrical connectors become smaller and more dense, tribological design considerations of friction and wear are increasingly important. (Diagram by MIT OCW.)

Instructor(s)

MIT Course Number

2.800

As Taught In

Fall 2004

Level

Graduate

Cite This Course

Course Features

Course Description

This course addresses the design of tribological systems: the interfaces between two or more bodies in relative motion. Fundamental topics include: geometric, chemical, and physical characterization of surfaces; friction and wear mechanisms for metals, polymers, and ceramics, including abrasive wear, delamination theory, tool wear, erosive wear, wear of polymers and composites; and boundary lubrication and solid-film lubrication. The course also considers the relationship between nano-tribology and macro-tribology, rolling contacts, tribological problems in magnetic recording and electrical contacts, and monitoring and diagnosis of friction and wear. Case studies are used to illustrate key points.

Suh, Nam, and Nannaji Saka. 2.800 Tribology, Fall 2004. (MIT OpenCourseWare: Massachusetts Institute of Technology), http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/mechanical-engineering/2-800-tribology-fall-2004 (Accessed). License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA


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