Electromagnetic Interactions

A green Aurora Borealis shimmers over snow-covered Alaskan fields.

An aurora is caused by interactions between charged particles in solar winds and atoms in the Earth's ionosphere, and shaped by the Earth's magnetic field. It produces its own magnetic fluctuations and electrical currents. (Image courtesy of the U.S. Air Force.)

Instructor(s)

MIT Course Number

22.105

As Taught In

Fall 2005

Level

Graduate

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Course Features

Course Description

This course is a graduate level subject on electromagnetic theory with particular emphasis on basics and applications to Nuclear Science and Engineering. The basic topics covered include electrostatics, magnetostatics, and electromagnetic radiation. The applications include transmission lines, waveguides, antennas, scattering, shielding, charged particle collisions, Bremsstrahlung radiation, and Cerenkov radiation.

Acknowledgments

Professor Freidberg would like to acknowledge the immense contributions made to this course by its previous instructors, Ian Hutchinson and Ron Parker.

Other OCW Versions

Archived versions: Question_avt logo

Freidberg, Jeffrey. 22.105 Electromagnetic Interactions, Fall 2005. (MIT OpenCourseWare: Massachusetts Institute of Technology), http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/nuclear-engineering/22-105-electromagnetic-interactions-fall-2005 (Accessed). License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA


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