Textbook Contents

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Buy at Amazon Melcher, James R. Continuum Electromechanics. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1981. ISBN: 9780262131650.

Continuum Electromechanics Textbook Components

Continuum Electromechanics as one file actual size — 9x12in: (PDF - 43.9MB)
Continuum Electromechanics as one file scaled for 8.5x11in paper: (PDF - 41.5MB)

TEXTBOOK CONTENTS ACTUAL SIZE FILES 8.5x11 FILES
Front-End Matter (PDF - 1.9MB) (PDF - 1.9MB)
Front Matter
Title page 1
Dedication
Title page 2
Copyright notice
Preface
Table of contents, vii-xv
Title page 3

End Matter
Appendices
  • Appendix A: Differential operators in Cartesian, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates
  • Appendix B: Vector and operator identities
  • Appendix C: Films
Index, pp. I.1-I.14

Front matter (PDF)

End matter (PDF - 1.2MB)

Front matter (PDF)

End matter (PDF - 1.2MB)

Chapter 1: Introduction to Continuum Electromechanics, pp. 1.1-1.6 (PDF) (PDF)
1.1 Background, p. 1.1
1.2 Applications, p. 1.2
1.3 Energy conversion processes, p. 1.4
1.4 Dynamical processes and characteristic times, p. 1.4
1.5 Models and approximations, p. 1.4
1.6 Transfer relations and continuum dynamics of linear systems, p. 1.6
   
Chapter 2: Electrodynamic Laws, Approximations and Relations, pp. 2.1-2.54 (PDF - 3.5MB) (PDF - 3.5MB)
2.1 Definitions, p. 2.1
2.2 Differential laws of electrodynamics, p. 2.1
2.3 Quasistatic laws and and the time-rate expansion, p. 2.2
2.4 Continuum coordinates and the convective derivative, p. 2.6
2.5 Transformations between inertial frames, p. 2.7
2.6 Integral theorems, p. 2.9
2.7 Quasistatic integral laws, p. 2.10
2.8 Polarization of moving media, p. 2.11
2.9 Magnetization of moving media, p. 2.13
2.10 Jump conditions, p. 2.14
2.11 Lumped parameter electroquasistatic elements, p. 2.19
2.12 Lumped parameter magnetoquasistatic elements, p. 2.20
2.13 Conservation of electroquasistatic energy, p. 2.22
2.14 Conservation of magnetoquasistatic energy, p. 2.26
2.15 Complex amplitudes; Fourier amplitudes and Fourier transforms, p. 2.29
2.16 Flux-potential transfer relations for Laplacian fields, p. 2.32
2.17 Energy conservation and quasistatic transfer relations, p. 2.40
2.18 Solenoidal fields, vector potential and stream function, p. 2.42
2.19 Vector potential transfer relations for certain Laplacian fields, p. 2.42
2.20 Methodology, p. 2.46
Problems, p. 2.47

Sections 2.1-2.20 (PDF - 3.1MB)

Problems (PDF)

Sections 2.1-2.20
(PDF - 3.1MB)

Problems (PDF)

Chapter 3: Electromagnetic Forces, Force Densities and Stress Tensors, pp. 3.1-3.26 (PDF - 1.8MB) (PDF - 1.8MB)
3.1 Macroscopic versus microscopic forces, p. 3.1
3.2 The Lorentz force density, p. 3.1
3.3 Conduction, p. 3.2
3.4 Quasistatic force density, p. 3.4
3.5 Thermodynamics of discrete electromechanical coupling, p. 3.4
3.6 Polarization and magnetization force densities on tenuous dipoles, p. 3.6
3.7 Electric Korteweg-Helmholtz force density, p. 3.9
3.8 Magnetic Korteweg-Helmholtz force density, p. 3.13
3.9 Stress tensors, p. 3.15
3.10 Electromechanical stress tensors, p. 3.17
3.11 Surface force density, p. 3.19
3.12 Observations, p. 3.21
Problems, p. 3.23

Sections 3.1-3.12 (PDF - 1.6MB)

Problems (PDF)

Sections 3.1-3.12
(PDF - 1.6MB)

Problems (PDF)

Chapter 4: Electromechanical Kinematics: Energy-Conservation Models and Processes, pp. 4.1-4.60 (PDF - 4.8MB) (PDF - 4.5MB)
4.1 Objectives, p. 4.1
4.2 Stress, force, and torque in periodic systems, p. 4.1
4.3 Classification of devices and interactions, p. 4.2
4.4 Surface-coupled systems: a permanent polarization synchronous machine, p. 4.8
4.5 Constrained-charge transfer relations, p. 4.13
4.6 Kinematics of traveling-wave charged-particle devices, p. 4.17
4.7 Smooth air-gap synchronous machine model, p. 4.21
4.8 Constrained-current magnetoquasistatic transfer relations, p. 4.26
4.9 Exposed winding synchronous machine model, p. 4.28
4.10 D-C (Direct Current) magnetic machines, p. 4.33
4.11 Green?s function representations, p. 4.40
4.12 Quasi-one-dimensional models and space-rate expansion, p. 4.41
4.13 Variable-capacitance machines, p. 4.44
4.14 Van de Graaff machine, p. 4.49
4.15 Overview of electromechanical energy conversion limitations, p. 4.53
Problems, p. 4.57

Sections 4.1-4.15 (PDF - 4.6MB)

Problems (PDF)

Sections 4.1-4.15 (PDF - 4.2MB)

Problems (PDF)

Chapter 5: Charge Migration, Convection and Relaxation, pp. 5.1-5.77 (PDF - 5.1MB) (PDF - 5.1MB)
5.1 Introduction, p. 5.1
5.2 Charge conservation with material convection, p. 5.2
5.3 Migration in imposed fields and flows, p. 5.5
5.4 Ion drag anemometer, p. 5.7
5.5 Impact charging of macroscopic particles: the Whipple and Chalmers model, p. 5.9
5.6 Unipolar space charge dynamics: self-precipitation, p. 5.17
5.7 Collinear unipolar conduction and convection: steady D-C interactions, p. 5.22
5.8 Bipolar migration with space charge, p. 5.26
5.9 Conductivity and net charge evolution with generation and recombination: Ohmic limit, p. 5.33

Dynamics of Ohmic Conductors
5.10 Charge relaxation in deforming Ohmic conductors, p. 5.38
5.11 Ohmic conduction and convection in steady state: D-C interactions, p. 5.42
5.12 Transfer relations and boundary conditions for uniform Ohmic layers, p. 5.44
5.13 Electroquasistatic induction motor and tachometer, p. 5.45
5.14 An electroquasistatic induction motor: Von Quincke?s rotor, p. 5.49
5.15 Temporal modes of charge relaxation, p. 5.54
5.16 Time average of total forces and torques in the sinusoidal steady state, p. 5.60
5.17 Spatial modes and transients in the sinusoidal steady state, p. 5.61
Problems, p. 5.71

Sections 5.1-5.17 (PDF - 4.7MB)

Problems (PDF)

Sections 5.1-5.17 (PDF - 4.7MB)

Problems (PDF)

Chapter 6: Magnetic Diffusion and Induction Interactions, pp. 6.1-6.39 (PDF - 2.9MB) (PDF - 2.9MB)
6.1 Introduction, p. 6.1
6.2 Magnetic diffusion in moving media, p. 6.1
6.3 Boundary conditions for thin sheets and shells, p. 6.4
6.4 Magnetic induction motors and a tachometer, p. 6.6
6.5 Diffusion transfer relations for materials in uniform translation or rotation, p. 6.11
6.6 Induction motor with deep conductor: a magnetic diffusion study, p. 6.15
6.7 Electrical dissipation, p. 6.19
6.8 Skin-effect fields, relations, stress and dissipation, p. 6.20
6.9 Magnetic boundary layers, p. 6.22
6.10 Temporal modes of magnetic diffusion, p. 6.26
6.11 Magnetization hysteresis coupling: hysteresis motors, p. 6.30
Problems, p. 6.35

Sections 6.1-6.11 (PDF - 2.5MB)

Problems (PDF)

Sections 6.1-6.11 (PDF - 2.5MB)

Problems (PDF)

Chapter 7: Laws, Approximations and Relations of Fluid Mechanics, pp. 7.1-7.50 (PDF - 3.2MB) (PDF - 3.2MB)
7.1 Introduction, p. 7.1
7.2 Conservation of mass, p. 7.1
7.3 Conservation of momentum, p. 7.2
7.4, Equations of motion for an inviscid fluid, p. 7.2
7.5 Eulerian description of the fluid interface, p. 7.3
7.6 Surface tension surface force density, p. 7.4
7.7 Boundary and jump conditions, p. 7.8
7.8 Bernoulli?s equation and irrotational flow of homogeneous inviscid fluids, p. 7.9
7.9 Pressure-velocity relations for inviscid, incompressible fluid, p. 7.11
7.10 Weak compressibility, p. 7.13
7.11 Acoustic waves and transfer relations, p. 7.13
7.12 Acoustic waves, guides and transmission lines, p. 7.15
7.13 Experimental motivation for viscous stress dependence on strain rate, p. 7.18
7.14 Strain-rate tensor, p. 7.20
7.15 Stress-strain-rate relations, p. 7.21
7.16 Viscous force density and the Navier-Stokes?s equation, p. 7.24
7.17 Kinetic energy storage, power flow and viscous dissipation, p. 7.25
7.18 Viscous diffusion, p. 7.26
7.19 Perturbation viscous diffusion transfer relations, p. 7.28
7.20 Low Reynolds number transfer relations, p. 7.32
7.21 Stokes?s drag on a rigid sphere, p. 7.36
7.22 Lumped parameter thermodynamics of highly compressible fluids, p. 7.36
7.23 Internal energy conservation in a highly compressible fluid, p. 7.38
7.24 Overview, p. 7.41
Problems, p. 7.43

Sections 7.1-7.24 (PDF - 2.7MB)

Problems (PDF)

Sections 7.1-7.24 (PDF - 2.7MB)

Problems (PDF)

Chapter 8: Statics and Dynamics of Systems Having a Static Equilibrium, pp. 8.1-8.78 (PDF - 6.0MB) (PDF - 5.8MB)
8.1 Introduction, p. 8.1

Static Equilibria
8.2 Conditions for static equilibria, p. 8.1
8.3 Polarization and magnetization equilibria: force density and stress tensor representations, p. 8.4
8.4 Charge conserving and unifom current static equilibria, p. 8.8
8.5 Potential and flux conserving equilibria, p. 8.11

Homogeneous Bulk Interactions
8.6 Flux conserving continua and propagation of magnetic stress, p. 8.16
8.7 Potential conserving continua and electric shear stress instability, p. 8.20
8.8 Magneto-acoustic and electro-acoustic waves, p. 8.25

Piecewise Homogeneous Systems
8.9 Gravity-capillary dynamics, p. 8.28
8.10 Self-field interfacial instabilities, p. 8.33
8.11 Surface waves with imposed gradients, p. 8.38
8.12 Flux conserving dynamics of the surface coupled z-θ pinch, p. 8.40
8.13 Potential conserving stability of a charged drop: Rayleigh?s limit, p. 8.44
8.14 Charge conserving dynamics of stratified aerosols, p. 8.46
8.15 The z pinch with instantaneous magnetic diffusion, p. 8.50
8.16 Dynamic shear stress surface coupling, p. 8.54

Smoothly Inhomogeneous Systems and their Internal Modes
8.17 Frozen mass and charge density transfer relations, p. 8.57
8.18 Internal waves and instabilities, p. 8.62
Problems, p. 8.69

Sections 8.1-8.18 (PDF - 5.4MB)

Problems (PDF)

Sections 8.1-8.18 (PDF - 5.2MB)

Problems (PDF)

Chapter 9: Electromechanical Flows, pp. 9.1-9.64 (PDF - 4.7MB) (PDF - 4.6MB)
9.1 Introduction, p. 9.1
9.2 Homogeneous flows with irrotational force densities, p. 9.2

Flows with Imposed Surface and Volume Force Densities
9.3 Fully developed flows driven by imposed surface and volume force densities, p. 9.5
9.4 Surface-coupled fully developed flows, p. 9.7
9.5 Fully developed magnetic induction pumping, p. 9.11
9.6 Temporal flow development with imposed surface and volume force densities, p. 9.13
9.7 Viscous diffusion boundary layers, p. 9.16
9.8 Cellular creep flow induced by nonuniform fields, p. 9.22

Self-Consistent Imposed Field
9.9 Magnetic Hartmann type approximation and fully developed flows, p. 9.25
9.10 Flow development in the magnetic Hartmann approximation, p. 9.28
9.11 Electrohydrodynamic imposed field approximation, p. 9.32
9.12 Electrohydrodynamic "Hartmann" flow, p. 9.33
9.14 Conservative transitions in piecewise homogeneous flows, p. 9.37

Gas Dynamic Flows and Energy Converters
9.15 Quasi-one-dimensional compressible flow model, p. 9.41
9.16 Isentropic flow through nozzles and diffusers, p. 9.42
9.17 A magnetohydrodynamic energy converter, p. 9.45
9.18 An electrogasdynamic energy converter, p. 9.48
9.19 Thermal-electromechanical energy conversion systems, p. 9.53
Problems, p. 9.57

Sections 9.1-9.19 (PDF - 4.2MB)

Problems (PDF)

Sections 9.1-9.19 (PDF - 4.1MB)

Problems (PDF)

Chapter 10: Electromechanics with Thermal and Molecular Diffusion, pp. 10.1-10.41 (PDF - 2.7MB) (PDF - 2.7MB)
10.1 Introduction, p. 10.1
10.2 Laws, relations and parameters of convective diffusion, p. 10.1

Thermal Diffusion
10.3 Thermal transfer relations and an imposed dissipation response, p. 10.5
10.4 Thermally induced pumping and electrical augmentation of heat transfer, p. 10.8
10.5 Rotor model for natural convection in a magnetic field, p. 10.10
10.6 Hydromagnetic B?nard type instability, p. 10.15

Molecular Diffusion
10.7 Unipolar-ion diffusion charging of macroscopic particles, p. 10.19
10.8 Charge double layer, p. 10.21
10.9 Electrokinetic shear flow model, p. 10.23
10.10 Particle electrophoresis and sedimentation potential, p. 10.25
10.11 Electrocapillarity, p. 10.27
10.12 Motion of a liquid drop driven by internal currents, p. 10.32
Problems, p. 10.37

Sections 10.1-10.12 (PDF - 2.4MB)

Problems (PDF)

Sections 10.1-10.12 (PDF - 2.4MB)

Problems (PDF)

Chapter 11: Streaming Interactions, 11.1-11.79 (PDF - 6.6MB) (PDF - 5.2MB)
11.1 Introduction, p. 11.1

Ballistic Continua
11.2 Charged particles in vacuum; electron beams, p. 11.1
11.3 Magnetron electron flow, p. 11.3
11.4 Paraxial ray equation: magnetic and electric lenses, p. 11.6
11.5 Plasma electrons and electron beams, p. 11.10

Dynamics in Space and Time
11.6 Method of characteristics, p. 11.13
11.7 Nonlinear acoustic dynamics: shock formation, p. 11.16
11.8 Nonlinear magneto-acoustic dynamics, p. 11.21
11.9 Nonlinear electron beam dynamics, p. 11.23
11.10 Causality and boundary conditions: streaming hyperbolic systems, p. 11.27

Linear Dynamics in Terms of Complex Waves
11.11 Second-order complex waves, p. 11.37
11.12 Distinguishing amplifying from evanescent modes, p. 11.46
11.13 Distinguishing absolute from convective instabilities, p. 11.54
11.14 Kelvin-Helmholtz types of instability, p. 11.56
11.15 Two-stream field-coupled interactions, p. 11.65
11.16 Longitudinal boundary conditions and absolute instability, p. 11.66
11.17 Resistive-wall electron beam amplification, p. 11.68
Problems, p. 11.71

Sections 11.1-11.17 (PDF - 6.0MB)

Problems (PDF)

Sections 11.1-11.17 (PDF - 4.6MB)

Problems (PDF)