MIT Visualizing Cultures
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MIT Visualizing Cultures
Massachusetts Institute of Technology © 2015 Visualizing Cultures

Visualizing Cultures works with a growing roster of scholars and curators to develop content using images from the historical record to illuminate the modern history of Asia and the West. The following individuals have written or contributed to units that are currently available or in preparation:

Christopher Capozzola
Associate Professor of History, MIT School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences

Christopher Capozzola specializes in the political and cultural history of the United States from the late-19th century to the present. At MIT, he teaches courses in political and legal history, war and the military, and the history of international migration. In 2009, he won the James A. and Ruth Levitan Award for excellence in teaching in the School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

Units:
Photography & Power in the Colonial Philippines l, ll

John A. Crespi
Luce Associate Professor of Chinese
Director of Asian Studies, East Asian Languages and Literatures, Colgate University

Units:
China’s Modern Sketch l, ll, lll

John W. Dower
Emeritus Professor of History, MIT & Co-Director of Visualizing Cultures

Professor Dower’s many publications include War Without Mercy: Race and Power in the Pacific War, Empire and Aftermath, and Japan in War and Peace: Selected Essays. His most recent book, Embracing Defeat: Japan in the Wake of World War II, won numerous honors including the Pulitzer Prize in Letters for General Non-fiction. Professor Dower’s units focus on Japan’s emergence as a modern and imperialist state, beginning with the arrival of Commodore Perry in 1853.

Units:
The Opium War in Japanese Eyes
Black Ships & Samurai l, ll
Yokohama Boomtown
Throwing Off Asia l, ll, lll
Asia Rising
Yellow Promise/Yellow Peril
Ground Zero 1945: Pictures by Atomic Bomb Survivors

Kathryn Edgerton-Tarpley
Associate Professor, Department of History, San Diego State University

Kathryn Edgerton-Tarpley is an Associate Professor of Late Imperial and Modern Chinese History. Her research and teaching interests include East Asian history, world history, famine studies, cultural, social, and gender history, comparative responses to trauma and disaster, and recent Sino-Japanese and Sino-US relations. Her first book, Tears from Iron: Cultural Responses to Famine in Nineteenth-Century China, was published by the University of California Press in 2008.

Units:
“Pictures to Draw Tears from Iron”

Andrew Gordon
Lee and Juliet Folger Fund Professor of History, Harvard University

Andrew Gordon's teaching and research focuses primarily on modern Japan. He has written, edited, or translated numerous books and has published articles in journals in the United States, Japan, Great Britain, France, and Germany. His most recent publication is Fabricating Consumers: The Sewing Machine in Modern Japan (University of California Press, 2011; Japanese translation Misuzu Shobo, 2013), on the emergence of the modern consumer in Japan, using the sewing machine as window on that story.

Units:
Social Protest in Imperial Japan

Christopher Gerteis
Senior Lecturer in the History of Contemporary Japan
School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London

Dr Gerteis specializes in the social and cultural history of Japan from 1600 to the present. He is author of Gender Struggles: Wage-earning Women and Male-Dominated Unions in Postwar Japan. (Harvard University Press, 2009); co-editor of Japan since 1945: from Postwar to Post-Bubble (Bloomsbury, 2012); and editor of Critical Readings on the History of Industrialization in Modern Japan (3 vols). (Brill, 2012).

Units:
Political Protest in Interwar Japan l, ll

Linda Hoaglund
New Day Educational Filmmaker

Producer/Director Linda Hoaglund was born and raised in Japan. Her film Wings of Defeat (2008) told the story of Kamikaze pilots who survived WWII. She has recently directed and produced ANPO, a film about Japanese resistance to U.S. bases seen through the eyes and works of celebrated Japanese artists.

Units:
Protest Art in 1950s Japan

Allen Hockley
Associate Professor of Art History, Dartmouth College

Allen Hockley is a specialist in 19th- and early-20th-century photography in and about Asia; his work for VC introduces some of the pioneer commercial photography in 19th-century Japan.

Units:
Felice Beato’s Japan: Places
Globetrotters’ Japan: Places
Globetrotters’ Japan: People
John Thomson's China l

David Hogge

Head of Archives, Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery at Smithsonian Institution

Units:
The Empress Dowager and the Camera

Justin Jesty
Assistant Professor of Asian Languages and Literature, University of Washington

Units:
Tokyo 1960: Days of Rage & Grief

Karen Johnson
Author, Curricula
Units:
Selling Shiseido l, ll, lll

Patty Koller

Author, Curricula
Units:
Selling Shiseido l, ll, lll

Kathy Krauth
Elgin Heinz Outstanding Japanese Humanities Teacher
History Teacher at American School in Japan, Tokyo
Author, Curricula
Units:
Asia Rising
Yellow Promise/Yellow Peril

Lilian M. Li
Sara Lawrence Lightfoot Professor of History, Swarthmore College

Lillian M. Li taught courses on Chinese history and Japanese history, as well as courses on women's history, Orientalism, and the history of Beijing and Shanghai. She is the author of China's Silk Trade: Traditional Industry in the Modern World, 1842-1937 (1981) and Fighting Famine in North China: State, Market, and Environmental Decline, 1690s-1990s (2007), co-editor of Chinese History in Economic Perspective (1991), and co-author of Beijing: From Imperial Capital to Olympic City (2007, 2008).

Units:
The Garden of Perfect Brightness l, ll, lll

Meredith Melzer
Teacher, Vantage Point High School
Staff member, The Program for Teaching East Asia
Author, Curricula
Units:
Yokohama Boomtown

Shigeru Miyagawa
Professor of Linguistics & Kochi-Manjiro Professor of Japanese Language and Culture, MIT & Co-Director of Visualizing Cultures

At MIT since 1991, he has published, along with several books and monographs, over fifty articles on syntax, argument structure, and East Asian and Altaic linguistics. He also runs a laboratory that creates interactive educational programs. StarFestival, which looks at issues of growing up in multilingual, multicultural societies, was awarded the Best of Show at the 1997 MacWorld Exposition and the Irwin Sizer Award for the Most Significant Contribution to MIT Education. JP NET was one of the first online projects in the world to place an entire academic program on the Internet (1993-1994). He was on the original team that proposed OpenCourseWare, and has helped to start opencoursewares in Japan and elsewhere.

Anne Nishimura Morse
Curator of Japanese Art, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Several exhibitions curated by Anne Morse at the Boston MFA have been invaluable in preparing VC units that tap the MFA collections. Her exhibition catalogs include A Much Recorded War: The Russo-Japanese War in History and Imagery and the splendid Art of the Japanese Postcard: The Leonard A. Lauder Collection at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Units:
Asia Rising
Yellow Promise/Yellow Peril

Rebecca Nedostup
Associate Professor of History, Brown University

Rebecca Nedostup works at the intersection of politics, culture, and society during the 20th century in China and Taiwan. She is the author of Superstitious Regimes: Religion and the Politics of Chinese Modernity (Harvard Asia Center 2010), and is currently writing Living and Dying in the Long War: Tales of Displacement in China and Taiwan, 1937-1959. She is co-organizer and co-editor of the collaborative project "The Social Lives of Dead Bodies in Modern China."

Units:
Shanghai’s Lens on the New(s) l

Lynn Parisi
Director, The Program for Teaching East Asia
Author, Curricula
Units:
Rise & Fall of the Canton Trade System l, ll, lll, lV
The First Opium War
Black Ships & Samurai l, ll
Yokohama Boomtown
Throwing Off Asia l, ll, lll
Selling Shiseido l, ll, lll

Peter C. Perdue
Professor of Chinese History, Yale University
Formerly T.T. and Wei Fong Chao Professor of Asian Civilizations, MIT

Peter Perdue is author of Exhausting the Earth: State and Peasant in Hunan 1500-1850 A.D. and China Marches West: The Qing Conquest of Central Eurasia. An expert on Chinese economic history, Prof. Perdue is preparing units on China’s place in the global economy beginning with the Canton Trade System of the late-18th and early-19th centuries.

Units:
Rise & Fall of the Canton Trade System l, ll, lll, lV
The First Opium War
Shanghai’s Lens on the New(s) l, ll, lll
“The Cause of the Riots in the Yangtse Valley”

Ellen Sebring

Research Associate and Creative Director, MIT Visualizing Cultures

Ellen Sebring develops original content and media approaches for digital humanities focusing on image-driven scholarship using visuals from the historical record. As President of Botticelli Interactive, Inc. for six years, Sebring produced award-winning new media projects for museums, expositions, interactive television and documentaries. A video artist, she composes for image and sound and collaborates with choreographers.

Units:
Civilization & Barbarism
Visualizing Portugal

Yuki Tanaka
Professor, Hiroshima Peace Institute, Hiroshima City University, Japan

Author of Hidden Horrors: Japanese War Crimes in World War II (Transitions—Asia and Asian America) and Japan's Comfort Women: Sexual Slavery & Prostitution during World War II & the US Occupation (Asia's Transformations), Prof. Tanaka is a leading bilingual peace scholar. He provides an introduction to Akihiro Takahashi’s account of the atomic-bomb experience (see above).

Units:
Ground Zero 1945: A Schoolboy’s Story

Akihiro Takahashi
Former Director, Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum

A schoolboy in Hiroshima when the first atomic bomb was dropped, Mr. Takahashi’s narrative of his personal experience is accompanied by illustrations by Goro Shikoku.

Units:
Ground Zero 1945: A Schoolboy’s Story

James Ulak
Deputy Director, Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution

A specialist in the history of narrative painting production in 14th- and 15th-century Japan, Dr. Ulak received his Ph.D. from Case Western Reserve University (Cleveland) in 1994. In 1995, Dr. Ulak joined the staff of Freer|Sackler as Curator of Japanese Art (1995-2003). He has also held the positions of Head of Collections and Research and Chief Curator (2002-03) and Deputy Director (2003-10).

Units:
Kiyochika’s Tokyo
Tokyo Modern l, ll, lll

Jeffrey Wasserstrom
Chancellor's Professor of History, University of California Irvine

I am a modern Chinese social and cultural historian, with a strong interest in connecting China's past to its present and placing both into comparative and global perspective. I have taught and written about subjects ranging from gender to revolution, human rights to urban change. Both my first book, Student Protests in Twentieth-Century China: The View from Shanghai (Stanford, 1991), and one of my more recent ones, Global Shanghai, 1850-2010 (Routledge, 2009), have focused on China's largest metropolis.

Units:
Shanghai’s Lens on the New(s) l

Gennifer Weisenfeld
Professor of Art History and Visual Studies, Duke University

Gennifer Weisenfeld’s pioneer work on early-20th-century avant-garde and commercial art includes her book Mavo: Japanese Artists and the Avant-Garde, 1905-1931. She is working with the extensive archives of the Shiseido cosmetics firm to examine the emergence of consumer culture, commercial advertising, and a feminine ideal in early-20th-century Japan.

Units:
Selling Shiseido l, ll, lll

Alona C. Wilson

Assistant Director and Curator, Amistad Center

A curator specializing in photography, Alona Wilson introduces a pristine album by the pioneer Western photographer in Japan held by the Smith College Museum of Art.

Units:
Felice Beato’s Japan: People

Anne Yonemura
Senior Associate Curator, Japanese Art, Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution

Anne Yonemura’s 1990 catalog Yokohama: Prints from 19th-Century Japan was the inspiration for the VC unit on Japanese woodblock prints depicting foreigners in Japan in the 1860s. Her splendid commentaries on individual prints are incorporated into the Yokohama Boomtown Image Gallery.

Units:
Yokohama Boomtown









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