Readings

The following table lists the papers associated with each presentation at the 2006 Scene Understanding Symposium. All readings are courtesy of the person named and used with permission.

TIME TOPICS READINGS
8:55 Opening Remarks  
9:00-9:20 From Zero to Gist in 200 msec: The Time Course of Scene Recognition Oliva, Aude, and Antonio Torralba. “Building the Gist of a Scene: The Role of Global Image Features in Recognition.” (PDF - 1.0 MB)

Greene, Michelle R., and Aude Oliva. “Natural Scene Categorization from Conjunctions of Ecological Global Properties.” (PDF)

9:20-9:45 Feedforward Theories of Visual Cortex Predict Human Performance in Rapid Image Categorization Serre, Thomas, Minjoon Kouh, Charles Cadieu, Ulf Knoblich, Gabriel Kreiman, and Tomaso Poggio. “A Theory of Object Recognition: Computations and Circuits in the Feedforward Path of the Ventral Stream in Primate Visual Cortex.” (PDF - 6.1 MB)

Serre, Thomas, Lior Wolf, and Tomaso Poggio. “Object Recognition with Features Inspired by Visual Cortex.” (PDF)

9:45-10:05 Latency, Duration and Codes for Objects in Inferior Temporal Cortex Hung, Chou P., Gabriel Kreiman, Tomaso Poggio, and James J. DiCarlo. “Fast Readout of Object Identity from Macaque Inferior Temporal Cortex.” Science 310 (2005): 863-866.

Kreiman, Gabriel, Chou P. Hung, Alexander Karskov, Rodrigo Quian Quiroga, Tomaso Poggio, and James J. DiCarlo. “Object Selectivity of Local Field Potentials and Spikes in the Macaque Inferior Temporal Cortex.” Neuron 49 (2006): 433-445.

10:25-10:50 From Feedforward Vision to Natural Vision: The Impact of Free Viewing, Task, and Clutter on Monkey Inferior Temporal Object Representations DiCarlo, James J., and John H. R. Maunsell. “Form Representation in Monkey Inferotemporal Cortex Is Virtually Unaltered by Free Viewing.” Nature Neuroscience 3 (2000): 814-821.

Zoccolan, Davide, David D. Cox, and James J. DiCarlo. “Multiple Object Response Normalization in Monkey Inferotemporal Cortex.” The Journal of Neuroscience 25 (2005): 8150-8164.

Hung, Chou P., Gabriel Kreiman, Tomaso Poggio, and James J. DiCarlo. “Fast Readout of Object Identity from Macaque Inferior Temporal Cortex.” Science 310 (2005): 863-866.

10:50-11:10 Invariant Visual Representations of Natural Images by Single Neurons in the Human Brain Quiroga, R. Quian, L. Reddy, G. Kreiman, C. Koch, and I. Fried. “Invariant Visual Representation by Single Neurons in the Human Brain.” Nature 435 (2005): 1102-1107.
11:10-11:40 Perception of Objects in Natural Scenes and the Role of Attention Evans, Karla K., and Anne Treisman. “Perception of Objects in Natural Scenes: Is It Really Attention Free?” Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance 31 (2005): 1476-1492.
1:00-1:25 Natural Scene Categorization: From Humans to Computers  
1:25-1:50 Contextual Associations in the Brain Bar, Moshe. “Visual Objects in Context.” Nature Reviews 5 (2004): 617-629.
1:50-2:15 Using the Forest to See the Trees: A Computational Model Relating Features, Objects and Scenes Torralba, Antonio. “Contextual Priming for Object Detection.” International Journal of Computer Vision 53 (2003): 169-191.

Murphy, Kevin, Antonio Torralba, and William T. Freeman. “Using the Forest to See the Trees: A Graphical Model Relating Features, Objects, and Scenes.” (PDF)

Oliva, Aude, Antonio Torralba, Monica S. Castelhano, and John M. Henderson. “Top Down Control of Visual Attention in Object Detection.” (PDF)

2:25-2:45 Detecting and Remembering Pictures With and Without Visual Noise  
2:45-3:05 Scene Perception after Those First Few Hundred Milliseconds Oliva, Aude, Jeremy M. Wolfe, and Helga C. Arsenio. “Panoramic Search: The Interaction of Memory and Vision in Search Through a Familiar Scene.” Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance 30 (2004): 1132-1146.

Wolfe, Jeremy M. “Guided Search 4.0: Current Progress with a Model of Visual Search.” (PDF)

3:05-3:35 The Artist as Neuroscientist  
4:00-5:00 Brain and Cognitive Sciences Colloquium - Scene Processing with a Wave of Spikes: Reverse Engineering the Visual System  

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