Readings

Although there is no text book for this course, there are several books which may be useful as references.

Palnitkar, Samir. Verilog HDL: A Guide to Digital Design and Synthesis. 2nd ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2003. ISBN: 0130449113. 
A good introduction to Verilog-2001 well suited for the beginner.

Smith, Douglas. HDL Chip Design. Madison, AL: Doone Publishing, 2001. ISBN: 0965193438. 
A great book for the intermediate Verilog designer. Clearly outlines the relationship between Verilog models and the corresponding synthesized circuit.

Weste, Neil, and Kamran Eshraghian. Principles of CMOS VLSI Design: A Systems Perspective. 2nd ed. Reading, MA: Addison Wesley, 1994. ISBN: 0201533766. 
Covers a wide range of digital design topics from circuits to micro-architecture.

Smith, Michael. Application-Specific Integrated Circuits. Reading, MA: Addison Wesley, 1997. ISBN: 0201500221. 
A useful reference on many of the lower-level details about synthesis, place and route, and FPGA mapping.

Rabaey, Jan, Anantha Chandrakasan, and Borivoje Nikolic. Digital Integrated Circuits: A Design Perspective. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2002. ISBN: 0130909963. 
Classic text on desiging digital circuits. Most of the information in this book is below the level of design we will be using in 6.884, but it is a valuable resource for learning more about the circuits we are synthesizing to.

Sutherland, Ivan, Robert Sproull, and David Harris. Logical Effort: Designing Fast CMOS Circuits. San Francisco, CA: Morgan Kaufman, 1999. ISBN: 1558605576. 
This book introduces a framework for simple back-of-the-envelope calculations useful when designing CMOS circuits. The first chapter is available online.

Sweetman, Dominic. See MIPS Run. San Francisco, CA: Morgan Kaufman, 1999. ISBN: 1558604103. 
A very readable book about the MIPS architecture for assembly level programmers.