21W.747 | Spring 2015 | Undergraduate
Rhetoric
Course Description
This course is an examination of the theory, the practice, and the implications of rhetoric & rhetorical criticism. This semester, you will have the opportunity to deepen many of your skills: Analysis, persuasion, oral presentation, and critical thinking. In this course you will act as both a rhetor (a person who uses …
This course is an examination of the theory, the practice, and the implications of rhetoric & rhetorical criticism. This semester, you will have the opportunity to deepen many of your skills: Analysis, persuasion, oral presentation, and critical thinking. In this course you will act as both a rhetor (a person who uses rhetoric to persuade) and as a rhetorical critic (one who analyzes the rhetoric of others). Both the rhetor and the rhetorical critic write to persuade; both ask and answer important questions. Always one of their goals is to create new knowledge for all of us, so no endeavor in this class is a “mere exercise.”
Learning Resource Types
assignment Written Assignments
assignment Presentation Assignments
co_present Instructor Insights
A white marble statue of Socrates in Athens, Greece in front of a clear blue sky.
Rhetoric strives to create active and informed citizens. (Photograph courtesy of Duncan Hull.)